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Innovative water management in Singapore

Singapore has historically suffered from freshwater shortages and water insecurity. In the 2000s the Government of Singapore launched new policies to address this, providing grant funding and support to R&D in public sector and industry, investing in infrastructure to improve water cycle management, including water and wastewater treatment, and raising consumer awareness about water conservation through public information and labelling schemes. This helped increase water independence and establish a thriving and innovative water industry.

Replacement of incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lights in Ghana

By setting regulatory requirements, Ghana was able to successfully phase out inefficient incandescent bulbs, saving 6% of the country’s energy demand. A widespread transition to the responsible purchasing of better Compact Fluorescent Lights was achieved through regulation and standards, complemented by other measures including providing incentives to consumers, and certifying and labelling bulbs.

Eco-point incentive program In Japan

So as to encourage individuals to promote sustainable practices and environmentally conscious actions, an eco-point program implemented in Japan granted points to citizens taking environment-friendly actions. The campaign boosted the replacement demand in electronics stores, as consumers flock to accumulate Eco-points on purchases of eco-friendly home appliances.

Trash Per-bag Fee Collection Policy

The annual disposal fee necessary for waste management in Taiwan is roughly 95 million Euro. To decrease these costs and solve the related environmental problem, the Taipei City Government has adopted a "Trash Per-bag Fee Collection Policy" in July 2000, targeting strong waste reduction through the charging of trash collection fees per volume of waste.

Motiva Group: a state-owned specialist in energy and material efficiency

Motiva Group is an expert company owned by the Finnish state promoting efficient and sustainable use of energy and materials. It offers energy auditing and counselling on energy efficiency agreements, material efficiency, renewable energy and international cooperation for various stakeholders such as industry and SMEs, the public sector, schools and private households.

Eminent effect of the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Fund in Taiwan

Since 1981, Taiwan has continually encountered problems of soil and groundwater pollution generated by improper disposal of industrial wastewater, wastes, and air. To address this issue, the Environmental Protection Administration, Taiwan embarked on establishing relevant regulations: The "Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act" was officially announced by the President in 2000.

The Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool EPEAT® –supporting informed consumer decisions on green electronics

The Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT®) is a rating system in the USA allowing consumers, purchasers, manufacturers and resellers to identify environmentally preferable electronic goods. The registry is based on a set of environmental performance criteria that cover the full product lifecycle – including eco-design, production, energy use and recycling. It ranks products as EPEAT® Gold, Silver or Bronze. 

VGR procurement policy and Considerate Design adds up to a “Green list” in the region of Västra Götaland

To ensure more responsible purchasing, considering sustainable development, the region of Västra Götaland in Sweden has developed a method for sustainable procurement in public organizations. The method includes a “Green” list that can be used as a tool to help making sustainable choice when buying interior design products.

The Swedish Tool for Ecologically Sustainable Procurement provides support to public organizations

The Swedish Environmental Management Council has developed a tool for ecologically sustainable procurement to help public and private organizations make procurement processes more environmentally friendly, supporting responsible purchasing. The EKU-tool provides environmental criteria for different product groups, making it easier to define environmental requirements.

Use of life cycle assessment and index for recyclability tools to achieve sustainable production throughout Renault’s vehicle value chain.

Renault, an auto manufacturer in France and Japan, uses a range of management tools to systematically optimise sustainable production at each stage of its product lifecycle. 

Nordic Ecolabel – a Nordic Swan representing environmentally sound products and services

The Nordic Ecolabel, or Nordic Swan, is a voluntary labelling scheme that contributes to sustainable consumption. It takes into account a product’s whole life-cycle and evaluates its environmental impacts. The Ecolabel is predominant in DenmarkFinlandIcelandNorway and Sweden; it pertains to 63 different product groups and services.

Consumer information label to communicate sustainability aspects of products

The PRO PLANET label communicates that the German supermarket chain REWE  values its products not only in economic but also in ecological and social terms. REWE’s PRO PLANET products contribute to sustainable consumption since the environmental and social impacts identified in the whole product life-cycle are significantly overcome.

Cradle to Cradle (C2C) – the Dutch Region of Venlo towards a circular economy

Referred to as a global capital of Cradle to Cradle (C2C), the Dutch city of Venlo is the first municipality in the world to have fully adopted the principle of C2C on a regional scale. Engaging citizens, businesses and local authorities, the region is transforming into an innovative platform employing reverse logistics for a new circular economy with safe and healthy products. 

SBToolCZ: Innovative assessment tool for sustainable building performance

SBToolCZ is a tool for certifying and evaluating building quality in accordance with sustainable construction principles in the Czech Republic. With architects, engineers, building companies, and indirectly homeowners being the main users, the certification scheme acts as a marketing instrument and an inspiration for innovative building solutions.

A label that says more than a thousand words

The Blue Angel is the first and most well-known eco-label worldwide. Since 1978, it has set the standard for eco-friendly products and services selected by an independent jury in line with defined criteria. The Blue Angel is certifying the companies as form of a reward for their commitment to environmental protection. 

Top Runner Program – energy efficiency improvements by making the best available on the market, the new normal

Japan's Top Runner program is setting regulatory requirements as an efficiency performance standard for a wide variety of products sold in Japan. The officials test all of the products currently available in a category, determine the most efficient model, and establish that model's level of efficiency as the new baseline.

ECORUBBER

Current tire compositions include a wide variety of additives and compounds, including several types of rubber, carbon black, silica, polyester, etc. End-of-life (ELF) tires are considered as non-hazardous waste according to the Waste Directive and the European Waste List, but their landfilling is forbidden according to the Landfill Directive.

CLUVA

The CLimate change and Urban Vulnerability in Africa project (CLUVA) aims to develop methodologies to support African urban areas to handle climate change threats.

VIT-KIT

VIT kit stands for Vermicon Identification Technology kit. It consists of in situ bio sensing probes which look for specific bacteria. These kits can easily be deployed on site for water cycle monitoring. They are provided by vermicon (Germany).

CeFCo

Forest certification is a widely recognized method to prove sustainable forestry. It is also a rapidly growing trend at present, as the demand for certified wood has been increasing during the last two decades. Today, mainly the big actors within the field of forest and wood chain management are being certified. The 16 million small, private forest owners in Europe, holding 55 % of European forests, are often not. This is due to barriers such as certification cost and the fact that requirements are often developed for large-scale forestry. To ensure that small forest owners can compete on the same terms as the larger ones, the administrative, knowledge-related and financial barriers for certification of smaller forest owners must be cleared.

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