.

Innovative water management in Singapore

Singapore has historically suffered from freshwater shortages and water insecurity. In the 2000s the Government of Singapore launched new policies to address this, providing grant funding and support to R&D in public sector and industry, investing in infrastructure to improve water cycle management, including water and wastewater treatment, and raising consumer awareness about water conservation through public information and labelling schemes. This helped increase water independence and establish a thriving and innovative water industry.

Urban NEXUS approach in schools in Tanzania

By setting up synergies between water, energy and food policies, actions were taken to optimise resource use in schools in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Implementing an Urban NEXUS approach, actors from ICLEI and GIZ brought together a wide range of local stakeholders to achieve consensus on the actions to be taken. The results show the importance of recognising the linkages between water, energy and food, and the benefits that can be achieved through collaboration in these areas.

Metro Vancouver’s Regional Food System Strategy

Metro Vancouver developed a Regional Food System Strategy (RFFS), with the aim of developing a sustainable, resilient and healthy food system. By setting up a public-private partnership and setting up synergies between the individual local governments, the RFFS aims to deliver benefit for residents, support to business and protection of the natural environment. This holistic approach considers the role of stakeholders across the entire food system.

Training farmers to use Solar-Powered Irrigation Systems

In Pakistan, solar powered irrigation represents a clean and affordable water conservation solution for the agricultural sector. In order to promote the uptake of these systems a series of training programmes have been organised with farmers to familiarise them with solar powered pumping issues. By betterinforming and supporting technology adopters, the scheme hopes to accelerate the nationwide uptake of solar powered irrigation. 

European Water Partnership (EWP)

The European Water Partnership (EWP) aims at raising awareness on water usage by promoting its Water Vision for Europe.[1] The partnership is promoting the sector by initiating, supporting and enhancing the initiatives and projects of different stakeholders in order to facilitate a general mindset change and to achieve sustainable water resource management.

 

Restorative greenhouse solution converting saltwater into fresh water through evaporation

Farming in arid regions has so far been troublesome due to lack of fresh water. With a new design of greenhouses which incorporates desalination of saltwater through evaporation, a sustainable solution for growing crops in hot and dry climates is provided.

BRAHMATWINN

The BRAHMATWINN project has helped to fine-tune the Integrated Land Management System (ILMS) toolset that provides a software platform for implementing the EU recommended DPSIR methodology used for Integrated Land Water Resource Management (ILWRM). The combination of the methodology and the toolset allows data analysing and assessing the impact of Land Use and Climate changes on a river basin what ultimately provides the means for better managing and strategic planning of land use and water resources.

 

UncertWeb

The UncertWeb project, aims at managing the propagation of uncertainty, when integrating multiple resources, mainly models or data that are exposed as web services, into complex model workflows.

SWITCH

The Sustainable Water Management Improves Tomorrow Cities Health (SWITCH) is a project carried out between 2006 and 2011 to explore cities’needs for managing water in a greener way within the urban environment. To this end, a consortium of 35 partners from 15 countries analysed the key sustainability challenges in urban water management. The project was coordinated by the UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education; Core group Pollution Prevention and Resource Recovery (Netherlands), and was funded under the Sixth Framework Programme (FP6).

CYPROBELL

The CYPROBELL project aims to promote the use of an innovative decentralized recycling plant for recovering grey water in Cyprus. The so-developed technology constitutes a good water and wastewater treatment achievement for increasing the availability of potable water in countries affected by water scarcity, without requiring large infrastructures like storage facilities or desalinating plants.

FLOW-AID

By far, the largest demand for the world's water comes from agriculture, as more than two-thirds of the water withdrawn from the earth's rivers, lakes and aquifers is used for irrigation. A declining supply of water and a decrease in water quality are two of the main problems faced by the agricultural sector today, placing enormous pressure on agricultural policy-makers and farmers.